What is computer forensics?
What is computer forensics?

Computer forensics is the application of investigation and analysis techniques to gather and preserve evidence from a particular computing device in a way that is suitable for presentation in a court of law. The goal of Computer Forensic services is to perform a structured investigation and maintain a documented chain of evidence to find out exactly what happened on a computing device and who was responsible for it.

Computer forensics — which is sometimes referred to as computer forensic science — essentially is data recovery with legal compliance guidelines to make the information admissible in legal proceedings. The terms digital forensics and cyber forensics are often used as synonyms for computer forensics.

Digital forensics starts with the collection of information in a way that maintains its integrity. Investigators then analyze the data or system to determine if it was changed, how it was changed, and who made the changes. The use of computer forensics isn’t always tied to a crime.

The forensic process is also used as part of data recovery processes to gather data from a crashed server, failed drive, reformatted operating system (OS), or other situations where a system has unexpectedly stopped working.

Why is computer forensics important?

In the civil and criminal justice system, computer forensics helps ensure the integrity of digital evidence presented in court cases. As computers and other data-collecting devices are used more frequently in every aspect of life, digital evidence — and the forensic process used to collect, preserve and investigate it — has become more important in solving crimes and other legal issues.

The average person never sees much of the information modern devices collect. For instance, the computers in cars continually collect information on when the driver brakes, shifts, and changes speed without the driver being aware. However, this information can prove critical in solving a legal matter or a crime, and computer forensics often plays a role in identifying and preserving that information.

Digital evidence isn’t just useful in solving digital-world crimes, such as data theft, network breaches, and illicit online transactions. It’s also used to solve physical-world crimes, such as burglary, assault, hit-and-run accidents, and murder.

Businesses often use a multilayered data management, data governance, and network security strategy to keep proprietary information secure. Having data that’s well managed and safe can help streamline the forensic process should that data ever come under investigation.

Businesses also use computer forensics to track information related to a system or network compromise, which can be used to identify and prosecute cyber attackers. Businesses can also use digital forensic experts and processes to help them with data recovery in the event of a system or network failure caused by a natural or another disaster.

As the world becomes more reliant on digital technology for the core functions of life, cybercrime is rising. As such, computer forensic specialists no longer have a monopoly on the field. See how the police in the U.K. are adopting computer forensic techniques to keep up with increasing rates of cybercrime.

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